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Sciatica management

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Accordion Content

MSKDorset

Sciatica information

University hospital Dorset

Sciatica information

University hospital Dorset

McKenzie disc care

Physio-pedia

Sciatica

8 Exercises to AVOID for a bulging disc

ePainAssist

University Hospital Dorset

Exercises for under 55 yr olds

RehabMyPatient

Pelvic tilt

RehabMyPatient

Knee rolls

RehabMyPatient

Knee hugs

RehabMyPatient

Prone extensions

RehabMyPatient

Child pose

RehabMyPatient

Chair squat

RehabMyPatient

Standing lumbar extension

RehabMyPatient

Superman

MSKDorset

Sciatica management

OnlinePhysioExpert

COBRA lower back pain relief position: playlist

NHS exercises for disc herniation

AskDrJo

Herniated disc exercises

Disc bulge recovery (healing a herniated disc)

Dom McKay MSK Therapist

End stages sciatic recovery workout 18mins

HASfit

University hospital Dorset

Sciatica exercises

NorthAmerican SpineSociety

Lumbar sciatica nerve flossing

AskDrJo

Sciatica exercises and neural gliding

ToneAndTighten

One exercise for sciatic pain relief: supine heel kicks

Piriformis syndrome, sciatica anatomy, everything you need to know.

Dr Nabil Ebraheim

Physiotutors

Piriformis test for tightness and syndrome

NHS exercises for piriformis syndrome

NHS exercises for piriformis syndrome in sitting

Piriformis syndrome mentoring minutes

PhysioU

AskDrJo

Five best sciatica stretches for piriformis syndrome

Advanced core exercises for piriformis strengthening

ThePhysioFix

TENS Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

Click image to view products
A TENS machine is a small, battery-operated device that has leads connected to sticky pads called electrodes. You attach the pads directly to your skin. When the machine is switched on, small electrical impulses are delivered to the affected area of your body, which you feel as a tingling sensation.
The electrical impulses can reduce the pain signals going to the spinal cord and brain, which may help relieve pain and relax muscles. They may also stimulate the production of endorphins, which are the body’s natural painkillers. 
(28.01.23 https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/transcutaneous-electrical-nerve-stimulation-tens/)/
 
1. Most types of joint pain
2. peripheral neuropathy
3. pregnancy delivery
 
 Click the icon to view TENs
 

Back support

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A Back Brace Belt has been manufactured and designed to help patients with chronic back pain, herniated disc, muscle spasm and weak lower back problems to provide the support needed to function during daily activity.

It is important to note that back supports need to be used alongside a strengthening programme for your core. See here for pilates. Do not leave yourself dependent on this device.
Please make sure you measure your waistline accurately and follow the fitting instructions.
Any new device will take time to get used to, so each day increase your use by 2 hours.

1. Degenerative lumbar spine
2. Osteoporosis of spine
3. Herniated disc
4. Annular tear of disc
5. Recent spinal surgery
6. Disciitis
7. Heavy manual workers
8. Repetitive activity
 
Click the icon to view options

Walking aids

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These devices provide stability, and promote independence and confidence when one is challenged by musculoskeletal problems. 
Conditions that often require walking aids:
1. Lower limb weakness and pain
2. Sciatica
3. Joint osteoarthritis
4. Frailty
5. Balance deficit
6. Neurological disorders
7. Post operative lower limb conditions
Click the icon to view walking aids

MSKDorset

Sciatica Stenosis

Physiopedia

Lumbar spinal stenosis

Anatomy and treatment

Nuvasive.com

Lumbar stenosis

Dr Gary Simonds 

Carilion clinic

University Hospital Dorset

Exercises for over 55 yr olds

RehabMyPatient

Child pose

RehabMyPatient

Trunk rotation

RehabMyPatient

Pelvic tilt sitting

RehabMyPatient

Side bend

RehabMyPatient

Pelvic tilt

RehabMyPatient

Both knee hugs

RehabMyPatient

Knee rolls

RehabMyPatient

Lumbar twist stretch

University hospital Dorset

Lumbar info and exercises

Chair exercises for spinal stenosis

Jake DeNell PT

Lincoln Orthopedic physical therapy

5 Best Lumbar stenosis exercises

Ask Dr Jo

NHS exercises for degenerative spinal stenosis

NHS exercises for degenerative spinal stenosis

NHS exercises for degenerative spinal stenosis

NHS exercises for degenerative spinal stenosis

NHS exercises for degenerative spinal stenosis

Back support

Click image to view products

A Back Brace Belt has been manufactured and designed to help patients with chronic back pain, herniated disc, muscle spasm and weak lower back problems to provide the support needed to function during daily activity.

It is important to note that back supports need to be used alongside a strengthening programme for your core. See here for pilates. Do not leave yourself dependent on this device.
Please make sure you measure your waistline accurately and follow the fitting instructions.
Any new device will take time to get used to, so each day increase your use by 2 hours.

1. Degenerative lumbar spine
2. Osteoporosis of spine
3. Herniated disc
4. Annular tear of disc
5. Recent spinal surgery
6. Disciitis
7. Heavy manual workers
8. Repetitive activity
 
Click the icon to view options

TENS Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

Click image to view products
A TENS machine is a small, battery-operated device that has leads connected to sticky pads called electrodes. You attach the pads directly to your skin. When the machine is switched on, small electrical impulses are delivered to the affected area of your body, which you feel as a tingling sensation.
The electrical impulses can reduce the pain signals going to the spinal cord and brain, which may help relieve pain and relax muscles. They may also stimulate the production of endorphins, which are the body’s natural painkillers. 
(28.01.23 https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/transcutaneous-electrical-nerve-stimulation-tens/)/
 
1. Most types of joint pain
2. peripheral neuropathy
3. pregnancy delivery
 
 Click the icon to view TENs
 

Nordic pole walking

Click image to view products
Nordic Walking uses specially designed poles – not to be confused with trekking poles – to enhance your natural walking experience. With a technique that is similar to the upper body action of classic cross-country skiing, Nordic Walking is a genuinely whole body exercise that can be enjoyed at many levels, at low, medium or high intensity. 
For those with persistent back pain, slightly flex forward your back posture to open up the space in your spine, this will help improve walking intensity. 
  • Burn around 20% more calories compared to walking without poles.
  • Release tension in your neck and shoulders.
  • Improve your posture and gait.
  • Strengthen your back and abdominal muscles.
  • Reduce the impact on your joints.

(28.01.23 https://britishnordicwalking.org.uk/pages/about-nordic-walking)

Click the icon to view poles

Walking aids

Click image to view products
These devices provide stability, and promote independence and confidence when one is challenged by musculoskeletal problems. 
Conditions that often require walking aids:
1. Lower limb weakness and pain
2. Sciatica
3. Joint osteoarthritis
4. Frailty
5. Balance deficit
6. Neurological disorders
7. Post operative lower limb conditions
Click the icon to view walking aids

RehabMyPatient

Femoral nerve stretch 1

RehabMyPatient

Femoral nerve stretch 2

RehabMyPatient

Femoral nerve stretch 3

Madan.narayanan

Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block

Healing hands of Nebraska PC

Surgery animation

 

Sciatica rehabilitation

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Understanding terminology

Atlantic spine centre

NorthAmerican SpineSociety

9 Tips for spine pain and sciatica

Chartered society physiotherapy

Cauda equina syndrome 

Its rare 0.0002% sciatica but it is an emergency.

New Hall hospital 

Spinal surgery

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