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Hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

NHSconditions

Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

Physio-pedia

Hypermobility

Dr Jessica Eccles

Link between hypermobility and anxiety

acmedsci

Dr Jessica Eccles

Hypermobility and neurodiversity

Brighton & Sussex Medical School

Hypermobility syndromes association

I am a zebra hypermobility and invisible disabilities.

A patients story

Search for help managing pain

Hypermobility syndromes association

Dr Jane Simmonds

Hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome for physical education

The Beighton score

Physiotutors

How to measure hypermobility

Hypermobility hacks – Why to hypermobile people have more pain

Lisa Howell

PerfectFormPhysiotherapy

Hypermobility hacks – posture playlist 

Lisa Howell – The Ballet Blog

Neck strengthening for beginners

Michelle Kenway PT

Pelvic strength and stability

Michelle Kenway PT

Jeannie Di Bon

Stabilize hypermobile shoulders

Jeannie Di Bon

Prevent sitting pain with hypermobility

Search for tape and bands

 

NHSconditions

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Physio-pedia

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

XpertDox

What is EDS ?

Search for help managing pain

The Beighton score

Physiotutors

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome society

Strengthen your hypermobile core

see minutes 17 – 45

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome society

Physiotherapy playlist 8 videos

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome society

Jeannie Di Bon

Hypermobility and EDS exercise playlist 60

Jeannie Di Bon

Prevent sitting pain with hypermobility

Kelly Robert

Pilates for EDS, POTS & Hypermobility – Health coach

Search for tape and bands

 

Nordic pole walking

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Nordic Walking uses specially designed poles – not to be confused with trekking poles – to enhance your natural walking experience. With a technique that is similar to the upper body action of classic cross-country skiing, Nordic Walking is a genuinely whole body exercise that can be enjoyed at many levels, at low, medium or high intensity. 
For those with persistent back pain, slightly flex forward your back posture to open up the space in your spine, this will help improve walking intensity. 
  • Burn around 20% more calories compared to walking without poles.
  • Release tension in your neck and shoulders.
  • Improve your posture and gait.
  • Strengthen your back and abdominal muscles.
  • Reduce the impact on your joints.

(28.01.23 https://britishnordicwalking.org.uk/pages/about-nordic-walking)

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Back support

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A Back Brace Belt has been manufactured and designed to help patients with chronic back pain, herniated disc, muscle spasm and weak lower back problems to provide the support needed to function during daily activity.

It is important to note that back supports need to be used alongside a strengthening programme for your core. See here for pilates. Do not leave yourself dependent on this device.
Please make sure you measure your waistline accurately and follow the fitting instructions.
Any new device will take time to get used to, so each day increase your use by 2 hours.

1. Degenerative lumbar spine
2. Osteoporosis of spine
3. Herniated disc
4. Annular tear of disc
5. Recent spinal surgery
6. Disciitis
7. Heavy manual workers
8. Repetitive activity
 
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TENS Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation

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A TENS machine is a small, battery-operated device that has leads connected to sticky pads called electrodes. You attach the pads directly to your skin. When the machine is switched on, small electrical impulses are delivered to the affected area of your body, which you feel as a tingling sensation.
The electrical impulses can reduce the pain signals going to the spinal cord and brain, which may help relieve pain and relax muscles. They may also stimulate the production of endorphins, which are the body’s natural painkillers. 
(28.01.23 https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/transcutaneous-electrical-nerve-stimulation-tens/)/
 
1. Most types of joint pain
2. peripheral neuropathy
3. pregnancy delivery
 
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Walking aids

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These devices provide stability, and promote independence and confidence when one is challenged by musculoskeletal problems. 
Conditions that often require walking aids:
1. Lower limb weakness and pain
2. Sciatica
3. Joint osteoarthritis
4. Frailty
5. Balance deficit
6. Neurological disorders
7. Post operative lower limb conditions
Click the icon to view walking aids
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